Families Of Five Children

Last week I suggested several books about families with six children or more. There are many more books about larger than average families. Today’s post is focusing on families of five children.

This begs the question, just what is average? I’m thinking when I complete my series on books about large families, I’ll share some books about more average size families, families with three, two or one children/child. I thank you all for your suggestions and please keep them coming, I’ll eventually compile a separate post or add your suggestion to each post.

Happy Little Family – Rebecca Caudill is the story of the Fairchild family, in particular Bonnie(4) who at times finds it frustrating to be the youngest of five, as her siblings consider her too young to join in the fun. Set in the Kentucky hills one hundred years ago. We really enjoyed this book and plan to one day purchase the sequels; Schoolhouse in the Woods, Up and Down the River and Schoolroom in the Parlor

Five Little Peppers And How They Grew – Margaret Sidney
Another book set long ago. Times are tough for widowed Mrs Pepper and her children but they have a positive outlook and the children are keen to help Mother, their attitudes are impressive. Lovely book.

The Children Who Lived in a Barn – Eleanor Graham
A book that I read in my childhood and the story stayed with me.  Five siblings are looking after themselves whilst their parents travel, when they receive news their parents’ plane is lost and their money dwindles they set out to look after themselves. They move out of their rented home into a nearby barn and set up house.  Their independence and resourcefulness appealed to me as a child, I never questioned ‘how’ they were able to achieve all this.  Might be time to re-read this.

Smoky-House – Elizabeth Goudge
A story about John Treguddick and his five children who live in a west country village in England. I actually haven’t read the book, flicking through I note it’s about smugglers and fairy-folk, but for some reason it seems a bit of a strange book.  Suzannah shares a more comprehensive review.

Family Conspiracy – Joan Phipson
Joan Phipson is an Australian author who often writes about families, the outback and resourceful siblings. In Family Conspiracy the children band together to earn money so Mother can have an operation she needs. Solid family solidarity, I’ve long been a fan of any of Joan Phipson’s books.  The Common Room has a more detailed review.

Caddie Woodlawn – Carol Ryrie Brink
Thinking about Caddie Woodlawn always brings back a special memory.  Several years ago when our oldest was nine and we had five children we read the entire book in one day.  The children begged for more and more, so I read and read until the entire book was finished! Caddie lives in frontier America and is an adventurer who loves hunting and plowing and making friends with the Indians. We loved Caddie so much, the children begged for more stories of Caddie, fortunately we found the sequel Magical Melons

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6 Responses

  1. These look great! You always have such awesome reading suggestions.

    I especially want to read The Children Who Lived in a Barn.

    Yay for families with five children! 🙂

  2. I enjoyed the Children who Lived in a Barn (though I read it as an adult). I was waiting for Five Little Peppers to make an appearance on your lists….another thought I have had is The Story Girl books by LM Montgomery. Another Elizabeth Goudge Linnets and Valerians is about a reasonably sized family – though if memory serves it might be 4 children.

  3. I only read Five Little Peppers recently after Agent Smelly told me how much she enjoyed it. You are right it is a very sweet book.

  4. Ooh Erin not sure if I have mentioned it before but please check out The Barn Chronicles by NZ author Rosie Boom. It's based on her own family of six children who she homeschooled (and still does a couple of them) after moving into a 90 year old barn on some land in the country. The first book is "Where Lions Roar at Night". I am sure your family will love it as much as ours (and most of the NZ homeschooling community) does. I can't recommend it enough. xx

  5. Yes, I wonder what is the average these days. 2.5 perhaps??

  6. Glad you like my suggestions:)
    Yes some of those books are yet to come.
    Didn't know about the Barn Chronicles at all!Sounds excellent.
    Is 2.5 average? at one stage it was 1.8 apparently.

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